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The Falcon And The Winter Soldier Episode 6 – Review

Mike Peters

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Falcon and Winter Soldier Episode 6 image
Marvel Studios

Episode six of The Falcon and The Winter Soldier series from Marvel is here, streaming now on Disney Plus, how does it move their story forward, here’s our review.

SPOILERS: If you’re reading this then you’ve probably seen the show, but if not there are spoilers ahead.

A new Cap

We’ve reached the end of the line with The Falcon and The Winter Soldier. This brief attempt at a superhero buddy cop hybrid is done. Whether it returns remains to be seen.

We pick up the action with Karli Morgenthau and The Flag-Smashers disrupting the meeting of the GRC and the intended signing of The Patch Act. Bucky and Sam, with help from Sharon Carter, are attempting to thwart their plans. John Walker, still believing that he is Captain America, is intent on ruining their intended chaos.

What we are treated to is the first outing of the new Captain America in Sam Wilson. With a very cool new suit provided by the Wakandans, he absolutely looks the part. Thankfully he acts it as well, saving a number of foreign dignitaries who have been abducted in a helicopter by The Flag-Smashers.

Batroc

Meanwhile, Bucky and Karli attempt to reason with each other, without success. It’s been an interesting plot point that the supposed heroes and villains of this series both agree on the same fundamental points. It’s their respective methods that bring the friction. The real feud in the finale was between Batroc and Sam Wilson, which played out like every epic final fight scene you can imagine.

The three-way Mexican standoff between Karli, Sharon and Batroc as all the double-crossing was revealed was a solid climax. The revelation that Karli used to work for Sharon was the only real surprise moment of the episode. Sharon being The Power-Broker was heavily alluded to in the previous episode. That said, I think that she may be protecting the true identity of The Power-Broker.

On the Raft

Despite being on The Raft, Zemo still managed to exert some influence from his maximum-security cell. He orchestrated the blowing up of many Flag-Smashers who were en route to The Raft in a prison van.

Bucky’s catharsis that we’ve witnessed throughout this series was finally completed. He admitted to Yuri that he was responsible for his son’s murder. Also, he left a parting gift for his psychiatrist in the form of his notebook, with all the names crossed out. He appears to be truly free of his Winter Soldier alter ego. Equally, Isaiah Bradley was finally afforded the recognition he deserved thanks to Sam’s intervention. We’ll ignore the fact that they somehow managed to fashion a full-size bronze statue of the man in a matter of days. Even the man he now stands alongside in the museum would have struggled to have done that!

Closing thoughts

Overall, I have to say that The Falcon and The Winter Soldier has been a disappointment. The finale encapsulated that perfectly. It had strong performances, brilliant cinematography and great stunts. But ultimately a lack of depth to the story and a consequent lack of tension letting the side down. The development of Sam Wilson as Captain America and John Walker as US Agent will save an awful lot of exposition and explanation when they next appear in a big-screen MCU outing. I also can’t wait to see Julia Louis Dreyfus reappear as ‘Val’ or Contessa or Madam Hydra. Yet again she stole the show with her brief cameo.

The producers couldn’t seem to be able to work out whether this was a TV series or a movie broken down into six parts. So it seemed to fall between two stalls. The series seemed to be much more about social commentary than entertainment. While there is nothing wrong with a moral element to a series, especially one which is about versus evil, the balance in The Falcon and The Winter Soldier seemed to be off. This left us a bit light on the story and the series suffered badly for that.

What next?

I’m sure we were all expecting a brilliant and mouthwatering post-credit scene as well. Instead, we got Sharon Carter being fully exonerated by the US Government and being invited to rejoin her old department. Then she calls a mystery person telling them that she now has access to everything in the government including secrets and prototype weapons. No cameos at all. Hardly the type of tease that Marvel fans are used to. Given the number of films and television series coming from Marvel over the next few months that is absolutely extraordinary. Especially when you consider the number that features brand new characters to the MCU eg. Kate Bishop as Hawkeye, Shang-Chi or Eternals. That film features a fantastic ensemble cast including Angelina Jolie and Richard Madden from Game of Thrones. It would have been great if they could have somehow featured in that post-credit scene.

I’m confident that Marvel is going to be back on form in a big way when Loki hits our screens in June. He is one of their strongest characters and Tom Hiddleston obviously revels in the mischief he is able to bring to the screen when he plays him. It bodes well that Marvel has already ordered a second series of the show before we have even seen the first one.


CULTURE CROSSING SCORE 6/10


Thank you for reading our review of The Falcon and The Winter Soldier episode six. Do you agree or disagree with our points or have anything to add? If so, leave us a comment below.


Read our The Falcon and The Winter Soldier episode five review HERE.

Read IMDB information about The Falcon and The Winter Soldier HERE.

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Comics & Literature

Shadow And Bone: Books vs. Series

Victoria Newell

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Shadow and Bone Season One image
Netflix

With the release of Netflix’s new fantasy series, Shadow and Bone, I utter words that I never thought would come out of my mouth “The screen adaptation was better than the book.”

While the Netflix adaptation did change some things in the book, they actually enhanced the story. All while adding a richness to the world. It kept with the integrity of the book, and met my extremely high expectations as a massive fan of the Grishaverse. But what did they change from the books? What changes were better, or fell flat? Here’s my spoiler-abundant review of Shadow and Bone.

Adaptation: Which books were included?

Shadow and Bone is based on a book trilogy by the same name written by Leigh Bardugo. She was also an executive producer and writer for the show. It tells the story of the mythical country Ravka which has been split in two by a mysterious swath of darkness populated by monsters called the Shadow Fold. It’s foretold that someone with the ability to summon light, the Sun Summoner, will one day destroy the Fold. When her best friend is in danger, Alina Starkov reveals the ability to summon light. This puts her on a collision course with some of the most powerful people in Ravka.

The show also included a prequel story to the Six of Crows duology, which is a series that takes place in the same world. But in a different country with different characters two years after the last Shadow and Bone book. Where Shadow and Bone is an epic story of good vs. evil, literal light vs. dark, Six of Crows is about a group of teenage gangsters committing felonies. It’s grittier, darker, and objectively better and has a large fan base. The show took three of the principal Six of Crows characters. It sent them after Alina Starkov for a cool million kruge.

The Sun Summoner

Let’s discuss our principal Sun Saint, played by Jessie Mei-Li. Alina feels as though she stepped right out of the book. Mei-Li did a fantastic job portraying her. The way that she feels lost and out of place in her world, her sense of humour, her charming dumb decisions. She’s earnest and kind, while subtly foreshadowing the greed for more power that comes into play in the later books.

One major difference from the show to the book is the anti-Shu (East Asian) racism at play in the show. In the mythical world of the Grishaverse, Alina’s country Ravka is at war with Fjerda in the north and Shu Han in the south. While Ravka is inspired by Russia, Fjerda by Germany/Scandinavia, Shu Han is inspired by East Asian cultures. Mei-Li is half Chinese, and therefore show Alina’s mother was Shu and her father was Ravkan. It makes sense that Ravkans would be hostile towards someone who looks like they come from a country they’ve been at war with for over a century. The change works well in the story’s favour. In the books, Alina always felt lonely and out of place. Adding this extra level of isolation drives home the feeling that she doesn’t know where she belongs.

Another major change comes in the way the story ended. At the end of the story, General Kirigan uses Alina’s power against her will to expand the Shadow Fold and use it as a weapon, killing hundreds of people. In the show, Alina is able to escape the Fold on their skiff with the help of several other characters. But in the book, Alina realizes her power in the same way she does in the show. But she uses it to jump off their skiff and run away with Mal, leaving everyone on the skiff to die. Living with the knowledge that she caused about a dozen deaths is definitely something Alina deals with in later books. The fact that she didn’t do that in the show might affect her character’s development moving forward.

But all in all, Jessie Mei-Li’s portrayal of Alina was perfect.

The Tracker

Alina’s best friend, Mal Oretsev, played by Archie Renaux, is disliked by a lot of book readers. Renaux’s portrayal of Mal, however, flipped a lot of people’s opinion on the talented tracker. In this fictional world, there are people known as Grisha who have the ability to manipulate things around them. In Ravka they are treated very well, and before Alina was discovered to be one, both of them had a certain level of disdain for Grisha. Mal and Alina are orphans who grew up together, in the show they call each other their “true north;” their home. He’s one of Alina’s prominent love interest’s and they have a close relationship.

In the book, Mal preferred Alina weak and without her power. He was more of a playboy, a little more selfish and arrogant, and less understanding. In the show, he spends a great deal of time being beat up and shot at in an attempt to get back to Alina. Seeing him track down the Stag for her, listening to letters he wrote to her that never got delivered really helped in understanding Mal’s character. And making him more likeable. In the show, he is principally concerned with protecting her and getting back to her, and Mei-Li and Renaux’s chemistry is off the charts. Renaux took a character that a lot of people have mixed feelings about, and made him into a fan favourite.

The Darkling

The Darkling, or General Kirigan, played by Ben Barnes, faced the most book to screen changes. The biggest being that in the book, he is referred to as only the Darkling. Whereas in the show he’s referred to as General Kirgian and “Darkling” is used as a slur. For reference, Kirgan is a powerful Grisha who has the ability to summon darkness and use it as a weapon.

It was a strange change, and I’m not sure why they did it, but it didn’t bother me too much. It took the mystery of his character away a little bit, but it’s something I can overlook. But there is one change to Kirigan’s name that truly bothers me. Kirigan’s back story and real name was revealed way too early. In the books that doesn’t happen until book three, Reign and Ruin. But we get his real name as an offhand comment in Episode Four and then his backstory in Episode Seven. General Kirigan is a fantastic villain but revealing his backstory this early waters down his character.

However, Ben Barnes understood the assignment. He portrayed Kirigan perfectly, really driving home how manipulative a villain he is. You want to like him, you want to trust him. The twist that he is the man who created the Shadow Fold and has no intention of destroying it stung even for book readers who knew it would happen. He’s likeable and hateable at the same time, and fans of the show are in the same boat as Alina. As in they have no idea whether to kiss him or kill him.

The Crows

By far the best addition to this show was including the Crows; our principal criminals from Six of Crows. The Six of Crows book follows Kaz Brekker, a rising star in the criminal underworld of Ketterdam, as he is hired to break a man out of a high security Fjerdan prison. He establishes a crew of Inej, Jesper, Matthias, Nina, and Wylan and they go have a heist.

The Crows have a lot of fans, so show-runners decided to twist the plot a little bit to include them. Six of Crows does do some groundwork in explaining where these characters are during the events of Shadow and Bone. From there it was finding ways for these two books to bump into each other. And they did it perfectly without making as many major plot changes as I thought they would.

Wylan is the only Crow missing from the line up in the show. But it should be noted that show-runners have said that he will be in Season Two.

Six of Crows outlines how star-crossed lovers Matthias and Nina meet each other, and the show follows that plot for the pair. Nina (Dannielle Galligan) is a powerful Heartrender, which is a Grisha who can control the body. Matthias (Calahan Skogman) is a Druskelle, a witch-hunter from Fjerda who had dedicated his life to hunting down and burning Grisha.

Shipwreck

After fate pulls Nina and Matthias together through a shipwreck, they have to rely on each other to survive. They fall in love in spite of their differences. But to save Matthias from her Grisha comrades, Nina gets Matthias arrested, claiming he’s a Kerch slaver. This destroys Matthias’ trust in her despite Nina still loving him and sets them on a course for Ketterdam. Both actors do a great job setting up their relationship in only a few short scenes. And showrunners set them up to join Kaz’s crew in the next season.

But the real stars are Kaz (Freddy Carter), Inej (Amita Suman), and Jesper (Kit Young). The three of them get just as much screen time as Alina, Kirigan, and Mal. Their story begins when they get a hit on a job to go to Ravka, cross the Fold, and bring back the woman who claims to be the Sun Summoner.

Six of Crows

Reading Six of Crows definitely makes the Crow plot more enjoyable, as it is teeming in Easter Eggs. But everything with the Crows in this show is prequel and therefore new. Kaz is still building a reputation in Ketterdam, Inej still belongs to the Menagerie, and Jesper is pretty much the same.

One complaint I’ve seen fans have is that Kaz is not violent enough. In the books, we’re talking about a man who ripped a guy’s eyes out. And convinced a man that he buried his toddler alive. He’s also smarter in the books, always has a plan, and is maybe the most intelligent character in the Grishaverse. Yet, in the show, he doesn’t win many fights and pushes himself into a corner. But I still think that Freddy Carter was the perfect Kaz.

Book order

Fans of the book should note that this story is two years before Six of Crows. He’s not the Kaz we know and love yet. He definitely lays crumbs down for him to become that, and there are scenes in the show where Kaz shows just how ruthless he can be. There were also complaints that he was too outward with his emotion. But everything that makes Kaz sympathetic in the book comes from that we can read his internal monologue.

If Carter and script writers portrayed Kaz like how he is in the book to a fault, we would have no reason to sympathize with him. In my opinion, Carter, who is openly a massive fan of Kaz Brekker, did a fantastic job with the character. Portraying a younger, less experienced Kaz.

They also did a fabulous job of setting up Kaz’s heart-wrenching back story without spoiling it too early (take notes Kirigan). They put emphasis on his cane, his gloves, his relationship with Barrel King Pekka Rollins, and his inability to touch people. Kaz is a disabled character, having to walk with cane, and suffers from extreme PTSD and touch aversion. Carter did an amazing job of portraying those things and how they make Kaz stronger. Kaz embraces every part of himself to the point that they truly do make him a force to be reckoned with, and the show did an excellent job with that.

Relationships

Another thing to note is his relationship to Inej. Inej was kidnapped from her home when she was fourteen and illegally sold to a brothel in Ketterdam. But Inej has some skills in terms of espionage as she was trained as an acrobat as a child.

So Kaz buys her indenture, setting up a payment plan to pay for the massive sum, and Inej works for Kaz. Inej can’t leave Ketterdam without her previous owner’s permission, so Kaz puts up his gambling hall as collateral and a promise to pay off her indenture in full when they return. Inej has also expressed that she has never killed anyone and doesn’t want to, but when Kaz is in mortal danger, Inej makes her fist kill. These two characters are never going to admit that they love each other, but they repeatedly show that they do through their actions, and in the end, Kaz begrudgingly admits that he needs her. Inej is also the most religious character in the show, and going after the Sun Saint definitely provides some conflict in her heart.

She’s an assassin who is full of compassion and is incredibly pious and complex. Suman did an amazing job bringing this complicated character to life, and Carter and Suman have wonderful tension in their scenes.

Kit Young

And here to steal the show is Kit Young as Jesper Fahey. He does a great job as comic relief, releasing tension in high-stress scenes and being the comedic break-out of the show. But even through that, he alludes to Jesper’s crippling gambling addiction, his desire to be validated by Kaz, and his tender friendship with Inej.

All three of these actors embody the Crows perfectly. They simply stepped off the pages, and seeing them cross paths with Shadow and Bone characters feels natural and exciting. They definitely stole the show and my heart.

Overall

All in all, there is way too much to discuss in this series vs. the book, so I’ll boil it down to this, Shadow and Bone was perfect. The casting was phenomenal, the plot changes were natural and bettered the story, the inclusion of the Crows was genius, and everything about it was incredible. It set up the Crows to be united as the six of them and set them up for future heists, and it propped up the Shadow and Bone arc for book two. The show has not been announced for another season yet, but Bardugo has stated that she wants five, and I’ll be praying to the Saints for as much as I can get.


What did you think of Shadow and Bone the series vs. the book? Let us know in the comments below.


Whilst on Netflix check out the best of British movies HERE.

Read IMDb information on Shadow and Bone HERE.

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